Relive your childhood on your Mac with this Nintendo 64 & PlayStation emulator

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The games of yesteryear are now within your reach with all-in-one game emulator OpenEmu‘s latest update, which adds popular titles from PlayStation, Nintendo 64, Sega, Atari and the like onto your Mac.

Free to download, OpenEmu features real time gameplay rewind, enhanced screenshot organization, improved home brew support and various interface upgrades, making the perfect game emulator to play to your heart’s content.

The below 16 consoles are now supported with this update:

Atari 5200 (Atari800)
Atari 7800 (ProSystem)
Atari Lynx (Mednafen)
ColecoVision (CrabEmu)
Famicom Disk System (Nestopia)
Intellivision (Bliss)
Nintendo 64 (Mupen64Plus)
Odyssey²/Videopac+ (O2EM)
PC-FX (Mednafen)
SG-1000 (CrabEmu)
Sega CD (GenesisPlus)
Sony PSP (PPSSPP)
Sony PlayStation (Mednafen)
TurboGrafx-CD/PCE-CD (Mednafen)
Vectrex (VecXGL)
WonderSwan (Mednafen)

TIME Magazine: Why Nintendo president Satoru Iwata mattered…

TIME (by Matt Peckham):

Nintendo President and CEO Satoru Iwata has died at only 55 years old after battling cancer for over a year. His unexpected passing marks the end of a wildly inventive and broadly celebrated 13-year stretch helming the iconic Kyoto video games company.

Iwata, born in Sapporo, Japan in 1959, was only the fourth person to lead Nintendo since its inception as a playing card company in 1889, and the first president unrelated to the founding Yamauchi family. His ascent to the topmost Nintendo position in 2002 was unusual as it followed a career in software engineering, making him one of the industry’s only corporate luminaries with substantial hands-on game creation experience.

In an exclusive interview with TIME this spring — Iwata’s last with a Western media outlet — he talked about how personally involved he remained in helping drive and evaluate the company’s hallmark unorthodox inventions. He called Nintendo “a company of Kyoto craftsman” and joking “this is where my background in technology is quite helpful, because it means that the engineers can’t trick me.

At Tokyo-based Nintendo affiliate HAL Laboratory during the 1980s and 90s, Iwata helped develop some of Nintendo’s most memorable games. That list includes Super Smash Bros. for the Nintendo 64, the opening salvo in a critically lauded and financially lucrative fighting series starring Nintendo characters like Mario and Donkey Kong that’s since sold in the tens of millions for the company. After he was promoted to president of HAL Laboratory in 1993, he continued to work personally on the company’s products, including several titles in Nintendo’s wildly popular Pokémon series.

Iwata’s move to Nintendo came in 2000, when he assumed management of the company’s corporate planning division. Just two years later, then-Nintendo President Hiroshi Yamauchi, who had helmed the company since 1949, decided to retire, allowing Iwata to step in and steer Nintendo through its most inventive period yet.

It was under Iwata that Nintendo ushered in the Nintendo DS, a dual-screen gaming handheld that succeeded the popular Game Boy, eventually going on to challenge Sony for the title of “bestselling games platform of all time.” Nintendo’s wildly successful Wii, now arguably the most recognizable video game system in the industry’s history, arrived in 2006, another Iwata-led gamble that paid incredible dividends following the company’s lackluster GameCube, which launched in 2001. And while Iwata’s critics often accused the company of reacting too slowly to industry trends, Iwata wasn’t afraid to enact radical change: after years of financial downturns (exacerbated by the company’s poorly received Wii U game console), he unveiled plans this March to develop games for smartphones and tablets. The world will now remember Iwata as the Nintendo leader who tore down the wall between the company’s heavily guarded iconic IP and non-Nintendo platforms.

But it was Iwata’s playful, almost mischievous and refreshingly candid personal style that so endeared him to the company’s fans. In 2011, he helped launch a video series dubbed Nintendo Direct, personally emceeing the company’s biggest surprises, often with quirky framing twists, like an effects-laden mock kung-fu brawl with Nintendo of America President Reggie Fils-Aimé for E3 2014. At Nintendo’s E3 2015 presentation last month, he appeared as a Muppet designed by The Jim Henson Company.

Iwata’s other significant public relations innovation was “Iwata Asks,” a remarkable series in which Iwata interviewed members of Nintendo’s many development teams, delving into the anecdotal history of some of the company’s best loved projects. It was a Nintendophile’s dream come true.

Above all, Iwata established and maintained a decorous tone often at odds with his competitors. In lieu of visually splashy, clamorous stage-led events at annual game shows, Iwata chose charmingly simple, almost dignified presentational vignettes. When fans responded negatively to a new Nintendo idea, Iwata’s reaction was often swift and direct: after an upcoming Nintendo DS game built on a hallowed Nintendo franchise was waved off by fans at E3 last month, Iwata tweeted his thanks to fans for their feedback and promised to meet their expectations.

Iwata’s health problems were first aired just before E3 in June 2014, when Iwata, who had been planning to attend the show (I was scheduled to meet with him), mysteriously backed out. At the time, Nintendo said Iwata’s doctors had warned him against travel, but didn’t say why. A few weeks later, the company disclosed Iwata was battling cancer, specifically a tumor in his bile duct. At that point he’d had surgery, and his prospects sounded hopeful because the doctors had apparently found the tumor early. When he resumed appearing in Nintendo Direct videos following E3, he was clearly thinner, but seemed otherwise unfazed. Though he again missed this year’s E3, he remained publicly active to the end, participating in Nintendo’s last shareholder meeting just a few weeks ago.

Japanese netizens rediscover “Full Armor Game Boy,” question how the ’90s defined portability

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Japanese netizens are reintroduced to the “Full Armor Game Boy”

RocketNews 24:

Despite the Game Boy’s revolutionary specs for its time, the small screen, the lack of a backlight and minuscule speaker left much to be desired for gamers in the 1990s. And although many just considered the Game Boy’s limitations a minor price to pay to take the fun of Nintendo anywhere they wanted, some accessory makers brought a few products to market to jazz it up a bit.

Recently Japanese netizens came across a picture of one such accessory that tripled the size of the Game Boy, calling to question just how “portable” this gaming option was.

A retro gaming enthusiast tweeted out a photo last week from a 1994 issue of the Japanese video game magazine Famitsu that shows a tricked-out version of the Game Boy he dubbed “Full Armor Game Boy.” The oversized device looks practically indestructible, almost like it came from the war room where military scientists engineered it to control missiles.

The somewhat awkward-looking add-ons are from an officially licensed Nintendo product called the Handy Boy (which you can still buy for US$29.99 on Amazon). The Handy Boy includes an adjustable magnifying screen, speakers, a light to for those nighttime Game Boy sessions, larger buttons, a miniature joystick and a neck strap to make holding the even bulkier device possible. Even though some YouTube reviewers of the Handy Boy say it makes the Game Boy a “wee bit top-heavy,” the packaging claims it is “lightweight” and has a “compact design.”

2015.03.02 Gamey Boy

Japanese netizens were taken aback at just how big all of these accessories made the Game Boy and wondered how this could possible be called a handheld video game console. While others wondered how uncomfortable it would be to actually play with everything attached like that. And for those that actually remembered squinting at the tiny green screen, they looked at this image in envy of the lucky kid whose parents bought them this Game Boy holy grail.

– “This is multitasking: video games AND weightlifting at the same time!”
– “Looks like a Game Boy crossed with a Transformer”
– “This is really stretching the limits of portability…”

Did you ever use the Handy Boy to trick out your Game Boy or wish you had? Let us know in the comments section below if you remember the joys (and perhaps still lingering neck pain) of playing Tetris on a magnified, lit-up screen with stereo sound!

 

Sony Japan accidentally erases 20th Anniversary PS4 contest entries

VG24/7:

Sony Japan has accidentally erased all information obtained from PlayStation owners who entered to win a 20th Anniversary PlayStation 4. Those who purchased PlayStation 3, PS4, Vita or Vita TV between December 4 – January 15 were handed a calendar with a code which entered them into the contest.

Somehow, all data collected from the customers was erased and cannot be recovered. Sony didn’t provide information on how the data was lost.

Customers can now re-enter the contest by sending all required information in again.

Whoops.

PS4 gets Final Fantasy, Dragon Quest crossover cover plate in Japan

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RocketNews 24:

Sony is holding a contest from February 24 to April 26, with the opportunity to win a special PlayStation 4 cover plate that features art from both the Dragon Quest and Final Fantasy series. The cover plate’s design features a Slime (a traditional monster from the Dragon Quest series), and a Moogle (a recurring race in the Final Fantasy series). The contest will be a lottery, and Sony will only make 100 copies of the cover plate.

Potential applicants will need to complete three steps to acquire a lottery ticket to win the cover plate.

Step 1 can be completed with any one of the following methods:

  • Purchase the “Dragon Quest Metal Slime Edition” PS4, enter the included special product code in the PS Store, and download the game.
  • Purchase the PS4 Dragon Quest Heroes game‘s limited first edition, and enter the special item code for the “Dragon Quest III Hero Costume” in the PS Store, and download the special item.
  • Purchase the digital download edition of Dragon Quest Heroes for the PS4.
  • Purchase the digital download car edition of Dragon Quest Heroes for the PS4.

Step 2 can be completed with either one of the following methods:

  • Purchase the “Final Fantasy Type-0 HD Suzaku Edition” PS4, and enter the included special product code for Final Fantasy XV – Episode Duscae in the PS Store, and download the game.
  • Purchase the Final Fantasy Type-0 HD Ultimate Box for PS4, and enter the included special product code for Final Fantasy XV – Episode Duscae in the PS Store, and download the game.
  • Purchase the Final Fantasy Type-0 HD limited first edition for PS4, and enter the included special product code for Final Fantasy XV – Episode Duscae in the PS Store, and download the game.
  • Purchase the digital download edition of Final Fantasy Type-0 HD for PS4.

Step 3 can be completed with the following method:

  • Download the “PS4 Dragon Quest x Final Fantasy Double Purchase Campaign Lottery Ticket”, for free.

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The 100 potential winners will be drawn from the users who successfully complete these steps and acquire the lottery ticket. The contest will run from February 24 to April 26.

All applicants will also receive a special Playstation 4 Dynamic Menu theme, with background art featuring the same art from the cover plate.

Dragon Quest Heroes is a roleplaying game in the long-running Dragon Quest RPG franchise. The game will be developed in collaboration with KOEI Tecmo Games’ Omega Force team, which also developed theWarriors series of games. In addition to being the first action RPG in the Dragon Questseries, the game will also be the first title in the series in ten years to be released on a PlayStation system. Yūji Horii is serving as the general director of the game, and Koichi Sugiyama is composing the soundtrack.

The story takes place in the kingdom of Elsarze, where humans and monsters work hand in hand, and everything is peaceful. However, one day, the monsters turn violent, and begin attacking the humans. Captains of the imperial guards Akt and Mare stand up in order to bring back the original hearts of the monsters, and bring peace back to Elsarze once more.

Square Enix shipped the game in Japan on Thursday, February 26. Square Enix has not yet announced a North American release date.

Final Fantasy Type-0 HD is the high-definition PS4/Xbox One port of Square Enix‘s original Final Fantasy Type-0 on the Playstation Portable system.

Square Enix describes Final Fantasy Type-0 HD:

“Step into the fray as Class Zero, a group of fourteen students from an elite military academy whose country is attacked by an aggressive neighboring Empire. Using the powerful abilities and magic of all fourteen characters in fast-paced action RPG combat, players must face the brutality and injustices of war to uncover the secrets of its genesis.”

Square Enix will release the game in North America on March 17, in Japan on March 19, and in Europe on March 20.

One year in, here’s what readers think of the PlayStation 4

One year in, here's what our readers think of the PlayStation 4

Engadget:

One year ago today, the PlayStation 4 was released in North America. When we took a look at it in our original review, we lauded the console for its “masculine chassis” that could “compete for visual attention” in your living room, a controller that’s “damn close” to being perfect and a user interface that marks a “massive improvement” over the PlayStation 3‘s. But games are the thing that can make or break a system and, while the initial games lineup had a few bright spots, the system had few “satisfying game experiences available at launch.”

Regardless, we called the PlayStation 4 “worth your hard-earned money” and said it was off to “a hell of a start.”

Since then, more games have been released and plenty of people have gotten their hands on a PlayStation 4 — more than 10 million people worldwide, in fact. After such a strong start, have things gotten better? Is it still worth the money? To find out, we turned to you, our readers, who have written some great user reviews to let us know how the system performs in the wild and whether it’s living up to its potential one year after release.

In many respects, our users agreed with our review, with MasterX25 loving its “sleek design” and admdrew saying it “fits well into standard entertainment centers.” Reactions to the controller were a little mixed, with admdrew calling it “almost” perfect, save for some odd button placement and the “weird nature of the touchpad.” But REZIN8 finds it “very small for my hands” with “terrible” battery life. The graphics were more well-received, withlogicrulez calling them “clear and detailed,” while nug050 says, “The gameplay is smooth at any resolution.”

But with a year under the PlayStation 4’s belt, it’s worth talking about the state of its games library. Though Saltank notes it has “some great exclusives,” many users, likeaussiegrossy, were left asking, “Where are the games?” Nug050 says there are “not enough A-List games” and PaulMEdwards also feels there aren’t “a ton of titles available currently,” specifically wishing for “more cooperative 2-player games so my wife … could play with me.”

But he also notes that some “really good ones are coming soon.” In fact, many of you were optimistic about future releases, with admdrew “eagerly awaiting GTA V’s upcoming release.” However, the continued lack of games especially hurts given what Saltank calls a “poor selection of apps,” and MasterX25 says, “I can’t use the PS4 for anything apart from playing games,” while aussiegrossy even feels it’s a bit of “a downgrade.”

Despite this continuing disappointment in the PlayStation 4’s game lineup, reviewers still feel rather magnanimous toward the system as a whole, with ghost616 telling us, “I do not regret buying it.” Meanwhile, in a similar vein, admdrew says, “I haven’t regretted my choice for a second.” With so much on the horizon for the system, year two looks rather promising for those who laid down their hard-earned money, as well as making it a great time for the rest of you to pick up a PlayStation 4.

Gamer Mold lets you make sweets in the shape of classic video game controllers

Controller-Mold

 

FoodBeast:

 

Every time we see a classic controller, the nostalgia feelings kick in. We remember waking up early on a Saturday morning, finishing the latest quest in Final Fantasy VII and spending our hard-earned GP at the Golden Saucer. The only thing better than recreating those memories would be doing so in cake form. Queue controller molds.

The silicone mold features three different controllers based off the classic Nintendo, Sony and Sega systems. It allows for two of each controller to be made at a single time. One can either create cakes with the molds, ice displays, or even pure melted chocolate ready to harden. The molds are yours to do with as you please.

The Classic Controller molds can be purchased at Think Geek for $10. They’re also dishwasher safe for you lazys.
Read more at http://www.foodbeast.com/news/gamer-mold-lets-you-make-sweets-in-the-shape-of-classic-controllers/#WwU7GY1zE0HMTXXI.99