There’s a new line of Sriracha-infused snacks

Healthy Asian food to start your New Year off right

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Audrey Magazine:

It’s that time of year again. January means everyone is excited and determined to fulfill their New Year’s resolutions. We’re going to go ahead and guess that one of your 2015 resolutions is to eat healthier. Well have no fear! We’re here to help you tackle that goal while still eating yummy Asian food. Here are five flavorful and healthy Asian foods that can be incorporated into anyone’s diet.

 

1. Japchae

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Love noodles but want to eliminate carbs from your diet? Try japchae, which is made from Korean sweet potato noodles called dangmyeon. Topped with healthy veggies and occasionally fried eggs, japchae is usually served as “banchan” or an appetizer to a meal. Eat up!

 

2. Bok Choy

Image courtesy of daily hiit

Bok choy is essentially Chinese cabbage. With only nine calories per serving and 0.1 grams of fat, bok choy is great for when you are ready to eat lots of tasty, flavorful greens veggies.

 

3. Kimchi

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Now, it’s time for Korean cabbage. If you can handle the spiciness, load up on the kimchi. Low in calories but high in fiber and antioxidants, kimchi helps regulate the cardiovascular and digestive system while providing vitamins that help reduce aging effects and blood sugar levels. Like japchae, kimchi is a quintessential Korean banchan dish.

 

4. Dal

Image courtesy of The Wanderer

Dal is quite simply spiced Indian lentils. Lentils themselves are one of the healthiest foods out there: lentils help lower cholesterol, regulate blood sugar and have a lot of protein without a lot of the fat. There are many different ways to make dal but all add flavor and comfort to the superfood that is lentils.

 

5. Sriracha

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Yes, really. The cult of sriracha has practically taken a life on it’s own and it’s all for the better. The red pepper chili sauce boosts metabolism and endorphins (which make you feel happier) while lowering blood sugar levels and cholesterol levels. Pour it up!

10 Asian soups to keep you warm over the holidays

mieayam

 Audrey Magazine:

On a blistering cold night, a steaming hot bowl of soup is the tastiest cure to the shivers and well, almost everything else right? Now that winter is full steam (sorry) ahead, here are ten different Asian soups, from the popular to the underrated, that you should try eating and possibly try making this winter!

1. Kuy Teav

Image courtesy of khatiya-komer

A Cambodian delicacy, kuy teav is a Camobidan Chinese pork noodle soup made from a clear broth and flat rice noodles. Kuy teav is usually enjoyed as a breakfast dish from street vendors, but we feel that it’s comforts will last throughout the day!

2. Soba

Image courtesy of kampai.us

Unlike the popular ramen, soba noodles are made from buckwheat flour. Soba can be a year round dish and is typically served either hot and in a soup for winter or chilled with a dipping sauce for summer. Also, soba differs from udon in that soba noodles are thin while udon noodles are genuinely thicker.

 3. Laksa

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A spicy MalayasianChinese fusion dish. There are three main types of laksa: curry laksa, asam laksa and sarawak laksa. Curry laksa has a coconut curry base, while asam laksa has a sourfish soup base, and sarawak has a sambal belacan base. No matter which type of laksa you choose, it’s sure to give you a kick!

4. Taiwanese Beef Noodle Soup

Image Courtesy of S.O.F.A.T BLOG

There are many different types of beef noodle soups out there. However, the red-braised beef noodle soup was invented by Chinese refugees in Taiwan during the Chinese Civil War. Today, Taiwan considers this red-braised beef noodle soup a national dish. With it’s tender beef and spicy broth, it is sure to be a comfort during those chilly months.

5. Tong Sui

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Tong Sui literally means “sugar water” in Cantonese and is a soup dessert that is a Cantonese delicacy.

6. Bakmi Ayam

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Bakmi ayam, or often shortened to mei ayam, is an Indonesian noodle soup that is very simple but delicious. The main ingredients are wheat noodles, chinese bok choy (cabbage), and slices of chicken and mushroom. Eaten separately or together with the broth, the soup is delicious either way!

7. Sinigang

Image courtesy of PanlasangPinoy

Sinigiang is a Filipino dish. A tamarind-based soup, Sinigiang is usually sour because of ingredients such as guava and ripe mango.

8. Soondobu Jjigae

Image courtesy of LTHforum

Soondubu jjigae is a spicy Korean tofu soup. It’s typically served in a hot stone pot with other dishes such as rice, meat, or banchan on the side.

9. Milagu Rasam

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Milagu Rasam is a pepper tamarind-based South Indian soup. Supposedly, both the black pepper and tamarind are natural heat-inducing ingredients for the body. Either way, milagu rasam is a tasty method to staying warm!

10. Bun Mang Vit

Image courtesy of PhamVo's Kitchen

Pho is probably the most famous Vietnamese soups, but Bun Mang Vit, a duck and noodle soup, is also another tasty option! The main ingredients here are duck, bamboo shoots and vermicelli noodles, but the lemongrass, ginger and chili give this soup a nice kick.

What’s Pho stuffed into a burrito called? A Phoritto, of course

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FoodBeast:

If you told us a few years ago that there would be a burrito that held the contents of a bowl of phở, we’d probably reply with “Why not make a burger out of ramen noodles while you’re at it?” Yet, here we are. The present.

Earlier this year, we discovered a restaurant that serves an orange chicken burrito stuffed with chow mein. Heaven, right? Looks like you can now enjoy a bowl of on-the-go phở by also wrapping it into a burrito.

Komodo invited us to come out and try their new phở burrito, fittingly titled the Phởrrito, at one of their brick-and-mortar locations. Made with thinly-sliced rib-eye steak, bean sprouts, cilantro, onions, Thai basil, jalapeño, lime juice and phở noodles, the burrito is wrapped with a large flour tortilla and served with sriracha and hoisin sauce.

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A close-up look at the Phởrrito. Screen licking is highly encouraged. 

What surprised us most about the Phởrrito is how much it actually tastes like a bowl of phở, the popular Vietnamese noodle soup that inspired this creation. Obviously it’s missing the key factor of broth, but then you’d get nothing more than a soggy burrito. Perhaps a phở broth-based au jus might be a possibility in the future? In the meantime, we’re more than happy chowing down on this beauty.

Oh, they also had a few other delicious munchies to offer.

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The Java, the MP3 and the Fish N’ Grapes.

Komodo has a pretty sizable menu of tacos inspired by different cultural cuisines. The Java features Indonesian pork braised in coconut milk. Marinated sirloin, tater tots and a fried egg make up the MP3. The Fish N’ Grapes includes a deep-fried Alaskan cod topped with a mixed salad of lettuce and grapes.

Obviously their portions are much larger, but after killing an entire Phởrrito, these itty bitty bites were all we could handle.

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The Komodo 2.0, the Loko Modo and the Asian Marinated Chicken.

The Komodo 2.0 is made with sirloin steak topped with southwest corn salad and jalapeño aioli. The Loko Moko features Hawaiian-seared Angus ground beef and teriyaki pineapple sauce topped with a fried egg. Finally, the Asian Marinated Chicken boasts grilled chicken, jalapeños, stir-fried rice and mandarin oranges topped with a soy sauce glaze.

All were pretty delicious, but we just can’t stop thinking about that Phởrrito.