Designer Yusuke Seki constructs a walkable platform made from 25,000 ceramic pots, bowls, and cups

Yusuke Seki - Ceramics

Beautiful Decay (by Hayley Evans):

Tokyo-based designer Yusuke Seki has constructed a stunning, walkable platform made from 25,000 pieces of scrapped pottery and porcelain. The structure is part of the Maruhiro Ceramics gallery, located in Hasami, Nagasaki prefecture, a region known for its production and distribution of tableware dating back to the 17th century. Each fragment was collected from local factories that had disposed the ceramics prior to the glazing process, deeming them defective. After restoring the pieces and assembling them like bricks mixed with poured concrete, Seki infuses them with a renewed creative purpose. A statement from Seki’s website further explains the history and the design approach that drives the platform:

“A renovation of the pre-existing flagship shop, Yusuke Seki’s design marries an architectural knowledge to the artisanal know-how of the region, and in so doing, creates an entirely location- and situation-specific experience. Seki’s vision is to posit the designer as interpreter. His methods seek to amplify Hasami’s heritage by drawing out and translating the potential of the complete local environment, unifying its people. A minimal design interference, a modification in the level of the floor, not only utilizes the pre-existing space to alter the perspective and experiences held by the users until the present, but also gives birth to an entirely new sense of flow within.”

In a fascinating exploration of space, Seki has designed the stacked ceramics so that they enhance the customer’s interaction with the displayed tableware. Low shelves placed on the surface allow visitors to peruse from below, and if they so wish, they can climb up the stairs to the top of the platform for a closer look. The very act of walking on the ceramics creates an embodied experience of tradition and history; delicate materials, once discarded, are made strong, creative, and participatory, signifying the endurance of and respect for a time-honored cultural art form.

Visit Seki’s website to view more of his works.

Yusuke Seki - Ceramics

Yusuke Seki - Ceramics

Yusuke Seki - Ceramics

Yusuke Seki designs second Otsuka Gofukuten Kimono store

Image of Yusuke Seki Designs Second Otsuka Gofukuten Kimono Store

 

After the successful restoration of a 70-year-old building for the first Otsuka-Gofukuten flagship store, interior designer Yusuke Seki, who embraces simplicity and practicality, designs the second branch based within a shopping mall in the heart of Kobe city. Seki created a very clean organic appearance for the space with functional properties to reflect the comparisons with Kimono. Such as, the shelves specifically designed in a three step, high-mid-low, price display system to represent the differing tiers of Kimono.

The overall display unit materials are made to stand out from the softness and sophistication of the clothing fabric. Making the most of this smaller, limited space, his design approach expresses a flexible and genuine understand of the brand and its cultural background.

 

Image of Yusuke Seki Designs Second Otsuka Gofukuten Kimono Store

Image of Yusuke Seki Designs Second Otsuka Gofukuten Kimono Store

Image of Yusuke Seki Designs Second Otsuka Gofukuten Kimono Store

Image of Yusuke Seki Designs Second Otsuka Gofukuten Kimono Store

Image of Yusuke Seki Designs Second Otsuka Gofukuten Kimono Store

Image of Yusuke Seki Designs Second Otsuka Gofukuten Kimono Store

Image of Yusuke Seki Designs Second Otsuka Gofukuten Kimono Store

Image of Yusuke Seki Designs Second Otsuka Gofukuten Kimono Store

Image of Yusuke Seki Designs Second Otsuka Gofukuten Kimono Store

 

Link

Interior Design: Nakagawa Masashichi Shoten-gai by Yusuke Seki Design Studio  

 

Image of Nakagawa Masashichi Shoten-gai by Yusuke Seki Design Studio                            Yusuke Seki is a Tokyo-based interior designer who embraces simplicity and functionality whilst manipulating the environment around him to a parallel particular theme. His latest effort comes as a rejuvenation to the utensils shop Nakagawa Masashichi Shoten-gai. Working with a shop that is best known for curating a collection of local goods found all over Japan, Seki created a space where each shelf represents a different brand covering a variety of districts throughout Japan. Inspired by a centralized city marketplace, the acclaimed designer added electrical signboards to identify the divided spaces, as well as placed all of its fixtures in the middle of the room just as a market would be positioned in its city.
Items on sale include utensils, furniture displays, socks, handkerchiefs and house hold products.
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Image of Nakagawa Masashichi Shoten-gai by Yusuke Seki Design Studio                           
Image of Nakagawa Masashichi Shoten-gai by Yusuke Seki Design Studio                           
Image of Nakagawa Masashichi Shoten-gai by Yusuke Seki Design Studio                            4 / 7
Image of Nakagawa Masashichi Shoten-gai by Yusuke Seki Design Studio                            Image of Nakagawa Masashichi Shoten-gai by Yusuke Seki Design Studio                           
Image of Nakagawa Masashichi Shoten-gai by Yusuke Seki Design Studio